Gentoo and KDE SC 4 (Akonadi and Friends)

This is not a thorough review. Instead, it’s more of a technology status update.

The Skinny

After a quick google search regarding Akonadi, Nepomuck and related services it has become apparent that there are/were a number of KDE users unsatisfied with the performance of these additions to the core of KDE. Naturally, this sparked my curiosity and I began to question my own system’s performance.

To my surprise, after a bit of research, how to remove/disable everything Akonadi is a relatively simple task for Gentoo users. The solution is not without sacrifice, however.

Adding

-semantic-desktop

to the global USE flags will basically strip all KDE components of Akonadi and all that relies on it’s existence. The caveat is you will lose some software, most notably:

kmail kdepim kontact kaddressbook korganizer blogilo 

Also, file properties will no longer be visible in any KDE application that relies on Akonadi and friends for this information. As such, the following software will no longer display detailed information for files:

dolphin genview konqueror 

I can live without the software as I never install or use the applications mentioned anyway. The file information is a bit of an inconvenience though.

The question of whether it is worth losing these features and applications ultimately boils down to whether there is any discernible performance gain. And in my own experience, I hadn’t noticed any difference at all. Perhaps all the issues have been resolved, or it is also very possible the issues reported are instead related to customized installs, distro specific changes, or hardware.

The Bottom-Line

In the end and as far as I am concerned, the system is usable in both states with or without semantic-desktop. So, I opt for greater usability of the desktop and plan to keep semantic-desktop enabled. And for those who want an even more lean-and-mean KDE install, at least the option is there to strip it down even further.

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